Tips for Prevention of Osteoporosis for the New Year

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Osteoporosis and Prevention for the New Year

About 54 million Americans suffer from Osteoporosis. Up to 50% of women aged 50 or older will fracture a bone due to osteoporosis.  This can make for dangerous conditions for women over the age of 50 that are involved in motor vehicle accidents, slips or falls.  Osteoporosis leads to a thinning of bones over time creating a low density of the bones. Women usually have lower bone density than men and with a loss of estrogen over time this increases the risk for osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is something that can be addressed before it ever becomes an issue.  The earlier in life we start building stronger bone density the later in life before we may experience osteoporosis.  By the age of 18 close to 90% of maximum bone density is reached.

Bone building sports can help in prevention of osteoporosis especially for females.  Out of all the impact sports that help with bone development, soccer is the best for bone density development for kids and teens.  Studies show that playing soccer during childhood and adolescence is a great tool to prevent osteoporotic problems in adulthood.  Adults should perform weight bearing exercise 3 to 4 days a week to help in prevention.

Dietary support of food rich in calcium, vitamin D and protein are great fuels to help build strong bones to prevent osteoporosis.  Women should try to ingest around 1,000 mg of calcium daily at ages under 50 and 1,200 mg if 50 and older.  If you want to make sure your calcium is being absorbed, then also make sure to have proper Vitamin D levels. This vitamin is key to aid in absorption but is often found to be low without proper supplementation.  Good sources of calcium in food can come from dark green leafy vegetables and calcium fortified foods.  Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, can be found in egg yolks, saltwater fish and liver.

If you are a smoker, then you should consider stopping if you want to preserve bone density.  There is nothing positive obtained from smoking and this is the same for bone density.  Smoking slows blood supply to bones and other tissues.  It inhibits osteoblast production which is responsible for building bone density.  Smoking decreases overall absorption of calcium and is a direct risk factor for fractures and osteoporosis.

If you regularly consume a large amount of alcohol, it will interfere with absorption of calcium.  It will affect the production of various hormones which have protective affect on bones and nutrients we need to absorb calcium.  Consuming larger amounts of alcohol also leads to an increase in falls and blunt traumas which also will lead to fractures.

There are other risk factors for osteoporosis, but it is a highly preventable condition.  If you choose to do the right things early on in life, you can have a foundation of strong bones later in life that will help in prevention of fractures.  Your lifestyle choices in your entire life cycle help shape your health later in life.  If you are concerned about your likelihood of osteoporosis, you can ask your health care professional to have a screening test to determine bone density.

 

— This article is written by Aaron Workman, DC  one of the members of Chambers Medical Group’s team of car accident chiropractors who offer a variety of treatments and therapies ranging from diagnostic testing to various soft tissue therapies for car accidents and injuries in Kentucky.

Have you been in a car accident? If you or somebody you know has been in a car accident, be sure that you seek medical attention from a car accident doctor or car accident chiropractor to treat your injuries. Visit Chambers Medical Group  to receive world-class medical treatment for your injuries.

Chambers Medical Group has car accident medical clinics in the following locations:

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